Original Article
 
Prevalence of diarrhea among under-five children in health extension model households in Bahir Dar Zuria district, north-western Ethiopia
Desalegn Tesfa Asnakew1, Mulat Gebrehiwot Teklu2, Solomon Assefa Woreta3
1MPH in Maternal and Child Health, Lecturer, Social and Public Health, Debretabor University, Debretabor, Amhara, Ethiopia.
2MPH in Environmental and Occupational Health and Safety Lecturer, Environmental and Occupational Health and Safety, University of Gondar, Gondar, Amhara, Ethiopia.
3MPH in Health Informatics Lecturer, Health Informatics, University of Gondar, Gondar, Amhara, Ethiopia.

Article ID: 100009P16DA2017
doi:10.5348/P16-2017-9-OA-1

Address correspondence to:
Solomon Assefa Woreta
University of Gondar, Institute of Public Health
Gondar, Amhara
Ethiopia, P.O. Box 1086

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How to cite this article
Asnakew DT, Teklu MG, Woreta SA. Prevalence of diarrhea among under-five children in health extension model households in Bahir Dar Zuria district, north western Ethiopia. Edorium J Public Health 2017;4:1–9.


Abstract
Aims: This study was carried out with an aim to assess the prevalence of diarrhea among under-five children and associated factors in health extensions model households in Bahir Dar Zuria district, North-western Ethiopia.
Methods: Community based cross-sectional study was carried out from August 25 to September 30, 2015 in Bahir Dar Zuria district, North-western Ethiopia. A proportionate stratified random sampling technique was used to select 734 households that had at least one under-five child. Data was collected via face to face interview using a structured questionnaire. The questionnaire includes socio-demographic characteristics, behavioral and environmental factors. Data were analyzed using SPSS version 20.0 statistical software. Bivariate and multivariate logistic regression analyses were undertaken to identify predictors of childhood diarrhea.
Results: In total, 715 women (model households) returned questionnaires, were valid for the analysis making a response rate of 97%. The two-week period prevalence of diarrhea among under-five children was 20%, which was associated with unimproved water source [AOR: 2.59, 95% CI: (1.71, 3.93)], with no functional latrine [AOR: 3.00, 95% CI : (1.95, 4.58)], animals living with human [AOR: 2.01, 95% CI: (1.33, 3.05)], partial practice of hand washing [AOR: 2.16, 95% CI; (1.38, 3.38)] and having two and more than two under-five children in the household [AOR: 2.31, 95% CI: (1.46, 3.65)].
Conclusion: This study revealed the two weeks' period prevalence of under-five diarrhea was relatively high. We noticed the availability of latrine, water source of the households, number of children in the households, hand washing methods of the mothers/caregivers and be housed with animals were significant predictors. Building improved water source and provide health education to the community about hand washing needs to be encouraged.

Keywords: Children, Diarrhea, Health extension model households


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Author Contributions:
Desalegn Tesfa Asnakew – Substantial contributions to conception and design, Acquisition of data, Analysis and interpretation of data, Drafting the article, Revising it critically for important intellectual content, Final approval of the version to be published
Mulat Gebrehiwot Teklu – Analysis and interpretation of data, Revising it critically for important intellectual content, Final approval of the version to be published
Solomon Assefa Woreta – Analysis and interpretation of data, Revising it critically for important intellectual content, Final approval of the version to be published
Guarantor of submission
The corresponding author is the guarantor of submission.
Source of support
None
Conflict of interest
Authors declare no conflict of interest.
Copyright
© 2017 Desalegn Tesfa Asnakew et al. This article is distributed under the terms of Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution and reproduction in any medium provided the original author(s) and original publisher are properly credited. Please see the copyright policy on the journal website for more information.